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Posts Tagged ‘teaspoons’

(Yes, all my posts at the moment are coming from The Guardian. The journalism there is not perfect, but they do some pretty interesting stories that the media here in Australia doesn’t seem to even get wind of.)

Some Israeli women wield the teaspoon of civil disobedience and smuggle Palestinian women out of the West Bank for a day at the beach.

Riki is a 63-year-old from Tel Aviv who, like the other women did not want to give her surname. She said it took her time to sign up to the trips. “I was resistant to breaking the law. But then I realised that civil action is the only way to go forward, that breaking an illegal law becomes legal.”

But all the Palestinian women have just one request: to go to the sea. For most, it’s their first trip to the seaside, even though it is a short drive from home.

Fatima, 24, gazes out at the horizon. “I didn’t know that the sound of the sea is so relaxing,” she said. Sara asks for a sheet of paper, speedily folds it into a paper boat and writes her name on it, intending to set it out to sea. “So that it will remember me,” she said.

Awesome.

Cross-posted (with added pic)

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ETA: Or maybe not!
Via

—————–

This post really warmed my heart.

Roxanne Shante – a teen rapper in the 1980s – had a contract with Warner Music. It included a clause that the company would pay for Shante’s education for the rest of her life.

She made them pay up. Including for her PhD.

That’s pretty fucking awesome.

h/t PostBourgie (the same link as above); see also the cross-post of the PostBourgie post at Bitch Ph.D. and the NY Daily article they both link to.

cross-posted<

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Fire Fly has more detail.

Basically: Indigenous Affairs Minister, Jenny Macklin, has announced that there will be a compulsory acquisition of Alice Springs town camps.

She has wonderful [that’s sarcasm] timing, today being the start of National Reconcilation Week and all.

Fire Fly has a good roundup of information, including the text of a statement put together by the group Stop The Intervention, which is to be presented to Jenny Macklin this Friday 29 May.

Email your support (individual or organisation) by tomorrow (Thursday 28 May).

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Are you, or have you ever been, a mother academic?

There’s a call for papers out for a collection of both narratives & articles about academic motherhood. (That takes you to a pdf, so if you don’t like those, try the general page here – the “Being a Mother Academic” link takes you to the same pdf link as above).

They are calling for both theory AND the “lived experience” – my reading of that is that papers can be either/or (that is, it seems to me that you are welcome to write a narrative piece about your experience, even if it’s not your theoretical area and you don’t want to include the theory).

They are also calling for people from across a range of disciplines.

Wouldn’t it be nice if they got so much Antipodean material that they decided they needed to put a separate Antipodean collection together?

[Link found at Feminist Law Professors]

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I’m feeling a little bit proud of myself. In the past 24 hours, I’ve made two complaints to supervisors about the marginally (ie socially) acceptable behaviour of young men, and been taken seriously. (Incidentally, both of the supervisors I spoke to were named Rachel. So: kudos to Rachels!)

There are descriptions of the complaints I made at the bottom of this post, but for me, the meat of it is about whingeing as a feminist act.

Whingeing, complaining, bitching (and their close relation, nagging) are all modes of communication that women are said to engage in more than men. Whenever we point out that something is wrong, we are accused of whingeing. Whenever we ask someone to do something, we are nagging. My apologies for the lack of links – I can’t think of any concrete examples. But my guess is that it’s happened to all of us. And it’s such a truism, it’s the subject of many jokes & cartoons (again, no concrete examples spring to mind).

[One exception: the trope that “men whinge when they’re sick”. But although that’s often the subject of jokes, it’s generally considered ok. Because they’re such reasonable manly macho men the rest of the time!]

[Yes, that was sarcasm. In case you were wondering.]

(more…)

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